www.olqmhereford.org.uk

Our Lady Queen of Martyrs

Roman Catholic Church Hereford

 

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SUNDAY MASSES  - 9.30AM/11.30AM/6.30PM.



 



 20th SUNDAY OF THE YEAR 

- 19th AUGUST 2018



(DRAFT BULLETRIN FOR 12th AUGUST)

(DRAFT BULLETIN FOR 5th AUGUST.)

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CATHOLIC BIBLE SCHOOL WEEKEND – We continue to make preparations for the Bible Weekend from 5th-7th October. The next planning meeting is Monday 10th September.

PILGRIMAGE TO THE GRAVE OF ST. JOHN KEMBLE – This Sunday 19thAugust, Welsh Newton Churchyard 3.00pm.

WELCOME BACK To Fr. Matthew, who has just returned from his holiday, and thanks to Fr. Jonathan for looking after the parish while he was away.

FUNERAL – The Requiem Mass and Funeral of Mary Fisher is this Wednesday at 1.00pm.

REFLECTION – WISDOMS FEAST. The Wisdom of God has prepared a feast, we hear in today's First Reading. We must become like children (see Matthew 18:3-4) to hear and accept this invitation. For in every Eucharist, it is the folly of the cross that is represented and renewed. To the world, it is foolishness to believe that the crucified Jesus rose from the dead. And for many, as for the crowds in today's Gospel, it is foolishness — maybe even madness — to believe that Jesus can give us His flesh to eat. Yet Jesus repeats himself with gathering intensity in the Gospel today. Notice the repetition of the words “eat” and “drink,” and “my flesh” and “my blood.” To heighten the unbelievable realism of what Jesus asks us to believe, John in these verses uses, not the ordinary Greek word for eating, but a cruder term, once reserved to describe the “munching” of feeding animals. The foolishness of God is wiser than human wisdom (see 1 Corinthians 1:18-25). In His foolish love, He chooses to save those who believe that His flesh is true food, His blood, true drink. Fear of the Lord, the desire to live by His will, is the beginning of true wisdom, Paul says in today's Epistle (see Proverbs 9:10). And as we sing in today's Psalm, those who fear Him shall not want for any good thing. Again today in the liturgy, we are called to renew our faith in the Eucharist, to forsake the foolishness of believing only what we can see with our eyes. We approach, then, not only an altar prepared with bread and wine, but the feast of Wisdom, the banquet of heaven — in which God our savior renews His everlasting covenant and promises to destroy death forever (see Isaiah 25:6-9). Let us make the most of our days, as Paul says, always, in the Eucharist, giving thanks to God for everything in the name of Jesus, the bread c0me down from heaven.